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A Candle for Softer, Smoother Skin

If you notice that you have patches of dry skin on your body, or see age spots and wrinkles – have no fear for you can now combat the premature signs of aging without having to go under the knife. All you need for softer, smoother skin is a candle. No, you don’t need a magic or a miraculous candle. All you need is a simple moisturizing candle.

These candles are just like your regular store-bought candles. The difference between moisturizing candles and ordinary candles lie in the wax that is used for the candle’s body. Standard candles are made of either paraffin or palm wax whereas the wax of moisturizing candles is composed primarily of cosmetic grade soy oil mixed another additive. Shea Butter and Vitamin E are sometimes included in the soy oil mix. Shea Butter has anti-inflammatory properties and contains fatty acids that help retain skin moisture and elasticity. Vitamin E contains antioxidants which are vital in protecting skin cells from the sun’s UV rays and pollution. Soy oil, Shea Butter and Vitamin E all help in keeping skin softer and smoother.

Moisturizing candles are used just like your regular candles, except that they do not need much heat to melt. The soy oil wax base melts 2 degrees higher than the normal body temperature. To use them, simply light the wick and let the wax melt until it forms a pool of oil. Dip your fingers into the melted oil pool, taking care not to burn yourself. The oil can then be spread on your skin. Moisturizing candles can be used to help heal burns, sores and scars, moisturize cracked heels, cuticles and nourish the skin on your hand, face and body. Daily use would diminish wrinkles and reduce the appearance of age spots.

Just like regular candles, they can be scented or unscented. Having scented oils added into the candle wax mix will not diminish the moisturizing properties of the soy oil wax. It may even enhance the ‘healing’ process because, not only will your skin be rejuvenated by the creamy oil mixture, your body will be relaxed as your senses absorb the soothing aroma the burning candle is giving off.

Unlike standard candles which are sold by itself, usually wrapped in plastic or paper, moisturizing candles usually come in small jars or glass bottles. The container serves as a decorative home to the solid candle and a vessel to hold the wax / soy oil when the candle melts.

Moisturizing candles are a fast, efficient, cost effective, healthy and natural way of caring for dry, dehydrated skin. However, despite the benefits, these candles must still be used with care. The hot wax can burn your skin or, in some cases, aggravate a pre-existing skin condition. To be safe, do not apply the oil from moisturizing candles on open wounds, and it may be best to consult with your doctor before embarking on a new skin regimen.

Moisturizing candles would make ideal personal or corporate gift and these can be purchased singly, in packs or by bulk if to be used as corporate give-aways.



Source by Marco Gonzalez

Why to Smell the Lid When Buying Scented Candles and Other Secret Candlemaking Details

The Scent is in the Jar Lid

My friend Joan has a lot of candlemaking expertise. I was amazed with a number of the secrets of purchasing candles when we went shopping.I adore the actual fragrance associated with candles when purchasing them My pal Joan noticed me smelling the actual candle to get the actual perfume and instead pointed to the lid of the candle box. My friend Joan was able to explain how the smell of the candle is distributed from the top towards the bottom. Over a period of time whenever a candle is contained in a box some of the smell will evaporate towards the top of the box. For this reason it is very important to smell the lid of the container and never the candle itself.This is comparable to wine tasting when individuals can swill a glass of wine when just before they taste it. Individuals will swill the glass of wine in it to get the top, middle and base note of the wine.

Candles started to wane as the main lighting source because of the introduction of the light bulb, they became a more ornamental product. Candles ended up being suddenly available in a wide variety of sizes, designs and colours. Customer fascination with scented candles started to escalate.

Why to not really Use Warmers

I always light a candle 15 minutes to Half an hour before an event to be able to set the scene. Joan explained that the fragrance emanates from the wax formed on the base when its lit. In order to get the proper smell it is necessary to light the candle half an hour before you need it. Joan explained her disastrous exposure to warmers. Warmers are particularly bad when you light the candle a number of times. As we have seen the aroma from the candle originates from the liquid wax at the base. This will work fine whenever you light a candle the very first or second time. However from then on the warming effect on the remainder of the candle will have driven the fragrance out of the candle.

Candlemaking History From 1AD to 1500AD

– Candlemaking can end up being traced to the Qin Empire in China in 3000 BC!

– Excavations coming from the earthquake in Pompeii reveal Candelabra

– Yak butter was utilized for candlemaking in Tibet

– In European countries, the earliest surviving candle was discovered close to Avignon in France, from the first century AD

– The oldest candlemaking manufacturers still around are Rathbornes Candles, founded in Dublin in 1488

How to Remove Soot

My mate Joan doesn’t like soot. Joan explained that by keeping the wick of a candle 0.25 inches from the top will stop soot forming at the top of the candle. If the wick is greater than a quarter of an inch it’ll just burn soot and not the candle beneath it. Good quality candles from reputable companies usually have less soot. A lumo cover over the candle is good for airflow and stopping soot from the candle.

How Long will A Candle Light For

I had one last question for Joan, just how long will probably a candle last? She said the formula is the complete weight divided by the burn rate. When you light the candle frequently it will also help as wax that forms on the side of the candle when it is lighting will solidify and need to be burned off again. When this was a bit too much for me she said that a 2 oz candle would take 10 hours to burn.



Source by Gerty C Swan

How to Make Natural Candles – Choosing the Best Wax For Making Candles at Home

There are several natural waxes to choose from for your homemade candle.

While paraffin may be natural in that it’s a petroleum-based wax it has been shown to be not so healthy & doesn’t burn clean so I think we can eliminate this wax.

Healthier natural candle waxes are Palm, Beeswax, and Soy & Ghee.

Let’s check out some pros & cons of each of these waxes.

Palm in made from the wax of the berry of the Palm tree. It’s white, all natural, renewable & clean burning.

Palm wax has a unique crystalline structure that is very attractive.

It can hold a very high scent load. Some palm waxes can hold up to twice as much scent as paraffin or soy wax.

Palm wax comes in granular form, is very easy to work with & it pools evenly when lit. It doesn’t need any additives & it cleans up easily with soap & warm water.

Cons of palm wax; the cost of palm wax is a slightly more than Soy wax.

Turning to Soy candle making, this wax has lots of Pros too. It burns long, cool & clean.

Here is a list of advantages a manufacturer gives about their soy wax:

o Made with pure, 100% natural soybeans

o Longer, cooler and cleaner burning without soot buildup

o Made in the USA with domestically grown crops

o Produced containing NO Genetically Modified Material

o Manufactured meeting FDA and Kosher standards

o Easy to clean up with soap and hot water eliminating solvents

o Renewable sustainable resources requiring plant growth

o Biodegradable and free from pesticides and herbicides

o Very stable allowing for long shelf life

o Not subject to animal testing

Cons of soy candles:

It’s stated by some manufactures that soy candles are produced containing no Genetically Modified Material. For most soy waxes this is only true because after processing there is no DNA in the wax left to assess whether the soy beans used were GMO or not. In the United States in 2002, 98% of the soybean harvest was either genetically modified (GMO) or non-GMO mixed in with GMO soybeans. The only reliable source of non-GMO soybeans are Identity Preserved or Certified Organic, these are very few. This means buying soy wax that is not Identity Preserved or certified organic is supporting the biotech industry. This is a disadvantage of soy wax in my opinion. Also I feel soy candles made from GMO soybeans can’t really be called “natural” as their DNA was humanly modified, the fact that the DNA was later removed doesn’t negate that.

Now lets look at Beeswax which has been used for candles since ancient times.

It burns slow & clean & has its own sweet fragrance.

It gives of more light & heat than other waxes & is virtually drip less.

Beeswax is the only fuel to emit negative ions when burning & this process cleans the air of positive ions such as dust, odors, toxins, pollen, mold, dust mites feces, and viruses.

Lighting a beeswax candle inspires a spiritual feeling; they have traditionally been the candles of choice in many churches.

Using a sheet of beeswax & rolling it up with a wick inside is such a simple way to start making candles, a pair of scissors are the only equipment needed. Beeswax candle making with sheets is child’s play.

Poured beeswax candles are just as easy to make as candles make with other waxes.

One con for beeswax is that the price is significantly more than other waxes but this is balanced by the quality it has of burning slower & lasting longer than other waxes. Beeswax can be added to other waxes to increase their burn time. Beeswax candles have their own natural sweet fragrance with which only some aromas will nicely blend. Beeswax can be bought in either a yellow or white color. Some white beeswax may have been bleached & have chemicals added, best check with the supplier.

Bayberry wax is an aromatic greenish vegetable wax that is removed from the surface of the Bayberry by boiling the berries in water and skimming the wax from the surface. Burning a Bayberry candle to the nub during the holidays is a 300-year tradition supposed to bring good luck in the coming year. Bayberry wax is recommended for making dipped tapers only & may not burn well as votive, tea-light or pillar candles.

Bayberry wax costs about 4 times that of Beeswax. It takes 15 pounds of Bayberries to make one pound of wax. It has a warm, earthy fragrance reminiscent of newly mown hay, and dries to a lovely olive green color. A small amount can be added to other waxes to make them harder & impart its green color. This is a pro as there are no other natural colorants for candles apart from the yellow of the beeswax. All natural candles, that is totally natural candles, are white unless they have beeswax or bayberry wax added.

Ghee lamps have traditionally been used by Sikhs & Hindus for thousands of years as a spiritual practice. Lighting the light dispels darkness & brings comfort, hope & peace. Lighting a light with cow ghee specifically is said to ensure radiance & heavenly bliss, prosperity, health & happiness.

Ghee is made from unsalted clarified butter. It is easy to make for one’s self at home or one can buy it from the grocery store. Organic ghee is available. Once one learns to make a container candle one can make a ghee candle. Securing the wick in the middle of the container without glue is the trick. Traditionally the receptacle of the ghee is earthen mud, silver, gold or brass, never stainless steel. The wick traditionally is laid on the bottom of the container & is propped up on the side of the lamp rather than standing up straight in the middle. I have bought a ghee candle made in a small glass jar with a lid that has a central wick & it works fine. I would be very careful about propping the wick on the side of a glass container. Ghee is very soft at room temperature & a liquid when heated so it needs a container. My ghee candle burns without a ghee smell & gives a very sweet feeling. Now I know how to wick the jar I can keep renewing the candle by adding ghee & wicks or I can make a much bigger one that burns longer for the same price as my little store bought candle.

Whichever material you use for your candle, don’t let having to decide which wax delay you making one! Choose a wax & make a candle, its fun, can save you money & using the candles brings bliss.



Source by Jess Woods

Staying Awake at the Wheel – Natural Help From Essential Oils

To stay alert and attentive at the wheel, forget the coffee, coffee and more coffee! Researchers from the Jesuit University in Wheeling, WV have shown that a whiff of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum) or Peppermint (Mentha Piperita)essential oil increases alertness, reduces fatigue, and even lowers drivers’ anxiety and frustration.

 

To test the effects of the aromas from these essential oils, the researchers had 25 college students sniff peppermint, cinnamon, or a non-odor control for 30 seconds every 15 minutes during simulated driving conditions.  

 

Prolonged driving led to increased anger and fatigue, and decreased vigor. With the scent of peppermint essential oil, fatigue, anxiety, and driver frustration ratings fell significantly and driver alertness ratings rose impressively.  

 

Smelling cinnamon also made drivers more alert and lowered their levels of frustration. Additionally, with the periodic whiffs of cinnamon aroma, ratings of “workload” associated with driving also fell.  

 

With these results it is reasonable to expect that periodic sniffs of peppermint or cinnamon essential oils may produce a more alert and conscientious driver and minimize fatigue associated with long road trips. 

 

There are endless instances where this could be helpful. A couple that come to mind are staying awake in church during a boring sermon, or staying awake during a recital or lecture. It is certain that most people will have some occasion where more alertness is needed. Use of these essential oils is a safe, natural way to keep alert. 

 

Take caution, however, when you sniff a bottle of cinnamon oil. It is really strong, so hold it several inches away from your nose, or sniff the cap. Otherwise it may be a bit overwhelming. 

 

While driving, put a few drops of the essential oil on a tissue, and then stick the end of the tissue in the vent of the air-conditioner, letting the air blow on the tissue and dispersing the oil throughout the car. This is similar to having your own diffuser. Now everyone in the car can perk up, and as a bonus, the stale air in the car will now be freshened. 

 

I invite you to my web-page to learn more about essential oils. 

 

This article is written for informational purposes only and is not meant to diagnose or treat medical problems. The advice and care of a physician is recommended for your health concerns. Aromatherapy is intended as complementary care with health care providers, not as an alternative to care. 



Source by Judy Lausch

Candle Love Spell – Get Back Your Lost Love

The golden rule about any Candle Love Spell is never to influence another person’s free will. If your lover wishes to come back to you on his/her own, only then will a Candle Love Spell work. Now let us get on with a few facts about love spells using candles.

Magic spells using candles have an ancient origin; they belong to the family of sympathetic magic and are simple, yet very powerful. And fancy complicated rituals are not at all necessary. If you want, you can customize a magic Candle Love Spell to suit your needs.

For candle love spells, normally pink and red candles are used. But if there is a lack of such colored candles, then paganism and Wiccan rituals permit the substitution of white candles. It is better to avoid petroleum based candles and use candles made of soy or natural beeswax. However, tradition permits you to use any type of candle as long as you charge your candles before performing the ritual.

The other name for this is dressing the altar candle. You have to prepare and charge your candle by inscribing names on it, anointing it with different types of essential oil and endowing it with your energy.

How to cast a Candle Love Spell?

After performing the steps described above, you have to cleanse your mind and body by taking a bath in essential oils and you also need to clean out the area surrounding you.

Relax your mood and mind, hold your candle. Then you have to envisage your lover coming back to you. Continue thinking about this mental image while the energy rising from your fervor gets embedded inside the candle.

Then you have to light the candle, watch it burn down, all the while dreaming about your lover coming back to you. At last, you either have to extinguish the candle mid way or let it burn down completely. You have to store the wax puddle and all other remains carefully in a silk scarf and keep the whole bundle in a safe place.

Tips for Candle Love Spell

You can use virgin red candles.

Name of your lost lover can be inscribed lengthwise on the candle using a nail or a knife tip or a pencil.

For anointing your candle, you can use virgin olive oil.

Using 7 thorns picked from a red primrose bush can increase the potency of the spell.

In the absence of rose thorns, you may use straight pins.

You may even chant a mantra while the candle burns and you are deep in your fervor. Repeat the following mantra thrice.

“Powers of the universe Bring…X…. back to me This is my will So mote it be.”



Source by Jack Daniel Morris

The History of Candles! Did You Know?

Candles have come a long way since their earliest known times from around the fourth century B.C. At one time, candles were one of the only sources of artificial light. The early Egyptians used rushes soaked in tallow (animal fat) and called them rushlights. During the time of the Roman Empire tallow was melted until it was liquid then poured over fibers of hemp or flax. The Chinese and Japanese made candles by using wax derived from insects and seeds and molded them in paper tubes. In India, taper candles were made from skimming wax off of boiling cinnamon. Beeswax candles came along in the Middle Ages, but quantities were limited, making it too expensive for anyone but the upper class.

Candle making, as we know it, made it`s debut during the thirteenth century when chandlers (candle makers) traveled door to door creating candles with the customer`s tallow or beeswax. In America, Native Americans made their first candles by using oily fish on a forked stick. Early missionaries would get their wax by boiling the bark of the Cerio tree. Early settlers of colonial America discovered that they could boil the berries from the bayberry shrub and create a wonderful smelling, good burning candle. Unfortunately, the process to make this wax was extremely tiresome and tedious. During the 19th century the first patented candle making machines were created. This allowed all homes, no matter what class, to have them.

No longer do we use candles as a primary source of light, but they`re still a very important part of our lives. We use them for many of our ceremonies, as decorations for our homes, to scent our homes, and to create warm glows in our homes during special, or romantic, occasions. What would romance be without candle light?



Source by DNea Smith

Why Aromatherapy Candles are Used During Massage Therapy

Aromatherapy candles scented with pure essential oils are in use to set the atmosphere and improve the ambience for ages. People often use scented candles to incite a romantic and sensual mood. Adding aromatherapy candles to the home is a quick way to create a peaceful atmosphere in a room especially after a busy day.

These scented candles are the most effective and cheapest process to rejuvenate your senses and body. Massage parlors use scented candles because the fragrance helps to get relaxation. This smell enters your body through breathing and gives you a soothing experience. Fragrance of Lavender is very helpful for relaxation and mental peace and hence this is one of the most popular scents used in aromatherapy

You need to be very careful while choosing and buying aromatherapy candles. Paraffin is the most commonly used material in cheap scented candles. You should buy top quality scented aromatherapy candles, which are made from soy wax or bees wax. Manufacturer of these scented candles normally takes great care in the choice of materials, as it will be undesirable to have the usual candle wax smell interfere with the sweet fragrance of the scent.

The scents or aroma you will get from aromatherapy candles is widely varied. You will get a wide range of options for you to choose in aromatherapy candles in market and internet.

According to aromatherapy practitioners like Charlene, there are specific candles to suit all human moods. You should know what aromatherapy is and how to use it to get maximum benefits. Candle manufacturers have identified this renewed interest in aromatherapy, and provide a wide range of products for those who want to combine a love of candles with an interest in aromatherapy.

René-Maurice Cattefossé first used the term Aromatherapy in 1928. Before 1928 the cosmetic and perfume industries had become the major users of essential oils and its use in medical science was minimum.

Candle Comfort is one company who produces top quality candles out of the excellent wax, colorings, scents, essential oils, and wicks made of paper core and are free of lead. These candles are of very high quality – they burn slowly and do not drip!

There are numerous aromatherapy products in the market like bath oils, body gels, and skin care products apart from candles. You can get the desired aromatherapy candles or essential oils with ease from a local store after doing a quick search in internet without going out for shopping



Source by Arindam Chattopadhyaya

Candle Making Soy Wax Manufacturers

Candles had been made from tallow for centuries. Beeswax candles were also available, but the beeswax was much more expensive. Paraffin wax was patented in 1876. It wasn’t until the late 20th century, however, that wax was made from soybean oil.

At present, there are a limited number of soy wax primary manufacturers. This article will focus on two: SoyaWax International, Inc., and Elevance Renewable Sciences, Inc.

Michael Richardson, patent-holder for the process of making soy wax, runs a company in Cedar Rapids, Iowa called SoyaWax International. It sells two soybean wax blends:

The first, Phytowax C-1, has a melting point of 130 F (54.4 C); it is formulated to adhere to the sides of containers. The second product, Phytowax PV-1, shrinks just enough so that it can be easily removed from votive molds. Its melting point is 155 F (68.3 C).

Cargill, who purchased the intellectual rights to Richardson’s patent, started a company called Elevance Renewable Sciences, which is headquartered in Bolingbrook, Illinois. They sell soybean wax and soybean wax blends using the brandname “Nature Wax.” Elevance sell their waxes both domestically and internationally. In the following list of products, add “BK” suffix after the product number would indicate that the product is supplied as a “block;” adding a “CT” suffix would indicate cut or flaked product:

13C2000 NatureWax C-1 Container Wax (25054) is a soy blend which is to be used for container candles. It has a melting point of 124-130 F (51.1-54.4 C) This product is available internationally.

13C1120 NatureWax C-3 also has a melting point of 124-130 F (51.1-54.4 C) This mix of hydrogenated vegetable glycerides with alpha-monoglycerides and sorbitan tristearate is formulated to be used in container candles and as a softener for pillar candles. This product is also available for international delivery.

Elevance sells five soy base stocks with different melting points. These are formulated for container candles and can also be used as a softener for pillar candles.

13C1040- NatureWax 97MP Soy Base Stock; its melting point is 97 F (36.1 C)

13C1400 – NatureWax S-113 Soy Base Stock; its melting point is 113 F (45 C)

13C1510 – NatureWax S-118 Soy Base Stock; its melting point is 118 F (47.8 C)

13C1590 – NatureWax S-128 Soy Base Stock; its melting point is 128 F (53.3 C)

13C1090 – NatureWax S-130 Soy Base Stock; its melting point is 130 F (54.4 C)

Elevance sells three base stocks which can be used as hardeners or as fragrance stabilizers, though their main intended use is for coating boxes. All three have melting points of 155 F (68.3 C)

12C1020 – NatureWax 155 MP Soy Base Stock

12C1420 – NatureWax X-155 Base Stock blend

12C1430 – NatureWax X-155 Base Stock 155 MP w/ MS (soy blend with Dimethylpolysiloxane)

Elevance also supplies Palm and Soy/Cotton base stocks.

This article has focused on two of the primary manufacturing companies of soybean wax. There are a variety of other soy wax manufacturing companies who do not do primary manufacturing. That is they do not extract the oil from the soybean. Instead they would start with soybean wax as a raw material to make their own wax blends.



Source by Mary Martha Deane

Why Aromatherapy Candles are Used During Massage Therapy

Aromatherapy candles scented with pure essential oils are in use to set the atmosphere and improve the ambience for ages. People often use scented candles to incite a romantic and sensual mood. Adding aromatherapy candles to the home is a quick way to create a peaceful atmosphere in a room especially after a busy day.

These scented candles are the most effective and cheapest process to rejuvenate your senses and body. Massage parlors use scented candles because the fragrance helps to get relaxation. This smell enters your body through breathing and gives you a soothing experience. Fragrance of Lavender is very helpful for relaxation and mental peace and hence this is one of the most popular scents used in aromatherapy

You need to be very careful while choosing and buying aromatherapy candles. Paraffin is the most commonly used material in cheap scented candles. You should buy top quality scented aromatherapy candles, which are made from soy wax or bees wax. Manufacturer of these scented candles normally takes great care in the choice of materials, as it will be undesirable to have the usual candle wax smell interfere with the sweet fragrance of the scent.

The scents or aroma you will get from aromatherapy candles is widely varied. You will get a wide range of options for you to choose in aromatherapy candles in market and internet.

According to aromatherapy practitioners like Charlene, there are specific candles to suit all human moods. You should know what aromatherapy is and how to use it to get maximum benefits. Candle manufacturers have identified this renewed interest in aromatherapy, and provide a wide range of products for those who want to combine a love of candles with an interest in aromatherapy.

René-Maurice Cattefossé first used the term Aromatherapy in 1928. Before 1928 the cosmetic and perfume industries had become the major users of essential oils and its use in medical science was minimum.

Candle Comfort is one company who produces top quality candles out of the excellent wax, colorings, scents, essential oils, and wicks made of paper core and are free of lead. These candles are of very high quality – they burn slowly and do not drip!

There are numerous aromatherapy products in the market like bath oils, body gels, and skin care products apart from candles. You can get the desired aromatherapy candles or essential oils with ease from a local store after doing a quick search in internet without going out for shopping



Source by Arindam Chattopadhyaya

How Do You Use Essential Oils to Make "Aromatherapy" Candles?

The term “aromatherapy” is a branch of alternative medicine which claims that the specific “aromas” carried by the essential oils have curative effects. The healing art “aromatherapy” traces back to 4,000 B.C. where the Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, and Persians use to burn herbs and flowers for curative and cosmetic purposes. In ancient Egypt, plant oils were widely used for spiritual relaxation, cosmetics and for embalming and mummification of the dead.

The term “aromatherapy candles” is used loosely in Western societies, because, unlike other cultures, we mainly use “aromatherapy candles” for “aesthetic” qualities vs. healing qualities. We want the calming, soothing aromas to aid in meditation, bathing and relaxing activities.

Natural candles are becoming more popular with the development of natural waxes such as soy wax and palm waxes. There is a greater desire by consumers to go “green” with all natural ingredients in candle making. Using all natural soy wax that is a renewable resource, grown right here in the U.S.A. has gained popularity in the few years, since the development of soy wax in 1998. Soy wax is hydrogenated soybean oil that is non-toxic, biodegradable and environmentally friendly. Combining all natural ingredients, including natural scents, to make an “aromatherapy” candle is highly desirable.

A lot of so called “aromatherapy” candles out on the market today contain paraffin wax (which is a byproduct of the crude oil process) and fragrance oils that are chemically derived. Some major manufacturers have paraffin wax, combined with natural scents. Some have natural waxes combined with chemical derived synthetic scents. My idea of a natural “aromatherapy candle” is one that is all natural. So, what are natural scents? They are essential oils.

Essential oils are volatile parts of plants, trees, fruits and roots that are extracted by various methods: steam distillation, cold-press extraction, chemical solvent extraction and the effleurage method. Essential oils that are “pure” will mostly have their botanical name on the jar, and come in dark colored bottles for protection from sunlight. They should be stored in cool, dark places, and out of reach of children and pets. Other essential oils are blended with carrier oils such as jojoba and are considered “diluted”. Some candle manufacturers sell “essential oils”, but they come in clear plastic containers, and are synthetically derived, or are blended with alcohol or other solvents.

Because of their concentrated nature, pure essential oils can be more expensive than fragrance oils and come in small bottles – drams (1/8 oz), 1/6 oz., etc. They either have a closed lid or a dropper to distribute the essential oils. Price can range from anywhere from $5 to $75 for a fraction of an ounce of pure essential oils.

So, how do you use essential oils in candle making? Good question – and there are many answers to that question, depending on who you talk to. When I originally tried to research this topic a year ago, there was very little information out on the Internet, with candle supply companies, or any e-books I purchased. One year later, there is a wide variety of answers published in articles, candle supply websites, and so-called “candle gurus”. Some experts claim that usage per pound of wax is 1 oz – which is similar to using fragrance oils. Now, 1 oz of pure essential oils can be either incredibly strong or incredibly expensive. Others claim that using as little 3-20 drops/pound of wax.

I personally believe that the aromatherapy candles should use much less essential oils than fragrance oils for two reasons:

1 Style & Taste. When using essential oils in aromatherapy candles, I want a milder, less dominant, natural scent aroma from the essential oils. I don’t want an over-powering Cinnamon Spice fragrance oil aroma that’s going to fill my entire house for days. I want a “natural” candle, because I want a soothing, relaxing, mild, fresh, natural aroma that gives just enough scent to soothe my senses for a beautiful bubble bath, meditation, yoga or Pilates exercises. I don’t want the aroma competing with what I’m trying to achieve – relaxation.

2. Cost. Essential oils are expensive, and cost should be considered when buying and using “pure” essential oils in candle making. First of all one dram (1/8 oz) of 100% pure Peppermint oil (made right here in the U.S.A.) on sale was $5/dram plus shipping. Honestly, do you think you it’s cost effective to use $5 of Peppermint oil in one 8-12 oz. soy candle? I don’t think so, besides, it may be too strong. Fragrance oils (mainly synthetics) can be 10 times less expensive when purchased in bulk. I’ve used blends of essential oils with 1/6 oz. and made three 12 oz. soy candles, and they were perfectly scented. So, it’s the cost/benefit rule you have to apply in determining how much you’re willing to pay to achieve your desired outcome.

Another important consideration in how much essential oils to use in candle making, is using the wax manufacturers guide in how much fragrance/essential oils that the wax will absorb in order to make a safe candle. I primarily use 100% soy waxes for my candle making, and the manufacturers recommendation is to use 3-9% of fragrance oil per pound of soy wax. There are additives which can increase those percentages, but I mainly use 1 oz. of fragrance oil/pound of soy wax, which is approximately 6%. When using essential oils, I use much less than 1%/pound of wax. It all depends on how strong or pure the natural oil is and my taste, of course!

So, with those facts explained, using essential oils is a matter of style, taste and cost. If you are selling your candles, you pass along your costs to the consumer, but hopefully, you can market and price your candles effectively to sell them at a profit. If you are making candles for your own enjoyment, then it’s a matter of what you’re happy with – milder/stronger, and whether cost is a factor for you.



Source by Laureen Falco

How to Make Natural Candles – Choosing the Best Wax For Making Candles at Home

There are several natural waxes to choose from for your homemade candle.

While paraffin may be natural in that it’s a petroleum-based wax it has been shown to be not so healthy & doesn’t burn clean so I think we can eliminate this wax.

Healthier natural candle waxes are Palm, Beeswax, and Soy & Ghee.

Let’s check out some pros & cons of each of these waxes.

Palm in made from the wax of the berry of the Palm tree. It’s white, all natural, renewable & clean burning.

Palm wax has a unique crystalline structure that is very attractive.

It can hold a very high scent load. Some palm waxes can hold up to twice as much scent as paraffin or soy wax.

Palm wax comes in granular form, is very easy to work with & it pools evenly when lit. It doesn’t need any additives & it cleans up easily with soap & warm water.

Cons of palm wax; the cost of palm wax is a slightly more than Soy wax.

Turning to Soy candle making, this wax has lots of Pros too. It burns long, cool & clean.

Here is a list of advantages a manufacturer gives about their soy wax:

o Made with pure, 100% natural soybeans

o Longer, cooler and cleaner burning without soot buildup

o Made in the USA with domestically grown crops

o Produced containing NO Genetically Modified Material

o Manufactured meeting FDA and Kosher standards

o Easy to clean up with soap and hot water eliminating solvents

o Renewable sustainable resources requiring plant growth

o Biodegradable and free from pesticides and herbicides

o Very stable allowing for long shelf life

o Not subject to animal testing

Cons of soy candles:

It’s stated by some manufactures that soy candles are produced containing no Genetically Modified Material. For most soy waxes this is only true because after processing there is no DNA in the wax left to assess whether the soy beans used were GMO or not. In the United States in 2002, 98% of the soybean harvest was either genetically modified (GMO) or non-GMO mixed in with GMO soybeans. The only reliable source of non-GMO soybeans are Identity Preserved or Certified Organic, these are very few. This means buying soy wax that is not Identity Preserved or certified organic is supporting the biotech industry. This is a disadvantage of soy wax in my opinion. Also I feel soy candles made from GMO soybeans can’t really be called “natural” as their DNA was humanly modified, the fact that the DNA was later removed doesn’t negate that.

Now lets look at Beeswax which has been used for candles since ancient times.

It burns slow & clean & has its own sweet fragrance.

It gives of more light & heat than other waxes & is virtually drip less.

Beeswax is the only fuel to emit negative ions when burning & this process cleans the air of positive ions such as dust, odors, toxins, pollen, mold, dust mites feces, and viruses.

Lighting a beeswax candle inspires a spiritual feeling; they have traditionally been the candles of choice in many churches.

Using a sheet of beeswax & rolling it up with a wick inside is such a simple way to start making candles, a pair of scissors are the only equipment needed. Beeswax candle making with sheets is child’s play.

Poured beeswax candles are just as easy to make as candles make with other waxes.

One con for beeswax is that the price is significantly more than other waxes but this is balanced by the quality it has of burning slower & lasting longer than other waxes. Beeswax can be added to other waxes to increase their burn time. Beeswax candles have their own natural sweet fragrance with which only some aromas will nicely blend. Beeswax can be bought in either a yellow or white color. Some white beeswax may have been bleached & have chemicals added, best check with the supplier.

Bayberry wax is an aromatic greenish vegetable wax that is removed from the surface of the Bayberry by boiling the berries in water and skimming the wax from the surface. Burning a Bayberry candle to the nub during the holidays is a 300-year tradition supposed to bring good luck in the coming year. Bayberry wax is recommended for making dipped tapers only & may not burn well as votive, tea-light or pillar candles.

Bayberry wax costs about 4 times that of Beeswax. It takes 15 pounds of Bayberries to make one pound of wax. It has a warm, earthy fragrance reminiscent of newly mown hay, and dries to a lovely olive green color. A small amount can be added to other waxes to make them harder & impart its green color. This is a pro as there are no other natural colorants for candles apart from the yellow of the beeswax. All natural candles, that is totally natural candles, are white unless they have beeswax or bayberry wax added.

Ghee lamps have traditionally been used by Sikhs & Hindus for thousands of years as a spiritual practice. Lighting the light dispels darkness & brings comfort, hope & peace. Lighting a light with cow ghee specifically is said to ensure radiance & heavenly bliss, prosperity, health & happiness.

Ghee is made from unsalted clarified butter. It is easy to make for one’s self at home or one can buy it from the grocery store. Organic ghee is available. Once one learns to make a container candle one can make a ghee candle. Securing the wick in the middle of the container without glue is the trick. Traditionally the receptacle of the ghee is earthen mud, silver, gold or brass, never stainless steel. The wick traditionally is laid on the bottom of the container & is propped up on the side of the lamp rather than standing up straight in the middle. I have bought a ghee candle made in a small glass jar with a lid that has a central wick & it works fine. I would be very careful about propping the wick on the side of a glass container. Ghee is very soft at room temperature & a liquid when heated so it needs a container. My ghee candle burns without a ghee smell & gives a very sweet feeling. Now I know how to wick the jar I can keep renewing the candle by adding ghee & wicks or I can make a much bigger one that burns longer for the same price as my little store bought candle.

Whichever material you use for your candle, don’t let having to decide which wax delay you making one! Choose a wax & make a candle, its fun, can save you money & using the candles brings bliss.



Source by Jess Woods

The History of Candles! Did You Know?

Candles have come a long way since their earliest known times from around the fourth century B.C. At one time, candles were one of the only sources of artificial light. The early Egyptians used rushes soaked in tallow (animal fat) and called them rushlights. During the time of the Roman Empire tallow was melted until it was liquid then poured over fibers of hemp or flax. The Chinese and Japanese made candles by using wax derived from insects and seeds and molded them in paper tubes. In India, taper candles were made from skimming wax off of boiling cinnamon. Beeswax candles came along in the Middle Ages, but quantities were limited, making it too expensive for anyone but the upper class.

Candle making, as we know it, made it`s debut during the thirteenth century when chandlers (candle makers) traveled door to door creating candles with the customer`s tallow or beeswax. In America, Native Americans made their first candles by using oily fish on a forked stick. Early missionaries would get their wax by boiling the bark of the Cerio tree. Early settlers of colonial America discovered that they could boil the berries from the bayberry shrub and create a wonderful smelling, good burning candle. Unfortunately, the process to make this wax was extremely tiresome and tedious. During the 19th century the first patented candle making machines were created. This allowed all homes, no matter what class, to have them.

No longer do we use candles as a primary source of light, but they`re still a very important part of our lives. We use them for many of our ceremonies, as decorations for our homes, to scent our homes, and to create warm glows in our homes during special, or romantic, occasions. What would romance be without candle light?



Source by DNea Smith

Explaining Coconut Wax – What You Need to Know About Candles and Coconut Wax

Candles have been around for centuries. Their uses in homes and other establishments are endless. They play a vital role in many important events, festivals and occasions – even considered sacred by various religions. A lot of people consider candles a must-have luxury item in homes and establishments. They are magical and beautiful in their own way, effective in creating a special sense of well-being, warmth and calm in any room.

Large companies make candles using modern equipment and technology. However, this can also be done at home using materials found in your very own kitchen. The ingredients for candle making can be purchased at local craft stores. You can create a simple candle out of the very basic ingredients or opt for a fancier type by incorporating fragrances and experimenting with different types of wax.

The wax is one of the most important ingredients in candle making. The wax you use plays an essential role in the kind of candle you will be able to create. In the past people have experimented with different raw materials to create the most unique and special wax for candle making. Coconut wax is one of the most recent discoveries.

What is Coconut Wax?

Coconut wax is made out of its raw product… (Yes, you guessed it right!) the coconut. The process involves gathering the coconut meat and cold pressing its oil. Using the hydrogenation process, coconut oil is transformed into wax. This is the same process used to make another type of candle wax, the soy wax.

More and more candle making enthusiasts now prefer to use coconut wax due to the fact that its burn is a lot cleaner compared to other types of wax. It is also said to burn a lot cooler and perfectly complements with different kinds of essential oils. Coconut is organic, sustainable and eco-friendly – factors that make it even more beneficial as an ingredient for candle making. As such, many people consider coconut wax as the best. You can also experiment with this wax by blending it with other types of candle wax.

Are you a candle making hobbyist? If you haven’t tried using coconut wax in the past, now might be a good time to experiment and discover the numerous benefits it brings to your life and home. Since scented candles also make great gifts, creating candles out of coconut wax might be a good way to impress your friends, family and colleagues.



Source by C M Baker

3 Must Have Essential Oils to Calm Your Pet

The reason I love animals so much is that they give off an attitude of happiness, innocence and unconditional love to their people.  Our pets are just as happy being a part of our household as we are of having them with us.

But sometimes an animal comes into our life that is a bit “out there!”

For instance, the dog that has an irrational fear of rain and won’t for the life of him go outside to potty during a rain shower.  Or the cat who hides for hours when a friend comes over.  Or, how about the dog with attachment issues that destroys the house while you’re at work?  Any of these sound familiar?

My cat’s, Sammie and Max, love to hang out on our screened-in patio.  But whenever the garbage truck comes rolling in, they flee for their lives!

It might sound crazy to us, but whatever your animal’s fears or wacky behaviors may be, they are completely legitimate in their minds.

Using essential oils on your animals can really take the edge off of their anxiety, big time!

Because of an animal’s heightened senses, they respond very well to essential oils.  In the wild, animals eat specific plants to heal themselves.  In captivity (our homes), the plant kingdom is not readily available.  Using essential oils on your pet gives them access to the vast healing properties of nature.

The three best essential oils to calm your pets are:

Lavender

Roman Chamomile

Peace & Calming® (a blend from Young Living)

These essential oils can be used to support your animal with; fear of rain and thunderstorms, separation anxiety, hyperactivity, trauma/abuse, depression, Illness, trips to the vet’s office, grief/loss of another family pet and any other situation that causes great stress for your animal, such as garbage trucks!

When you apply essential oils to animals, always remember less is more as animals are very sensitive to essential oils.

Also, with animals, it’s best to dilute essential oils with a carrier oil such as organic olive oil.  I recommend one part essential oil to 1 part carrier oil for all animals EXCEPT cats. The dilution ratio for cats is 1 part essential oil to 10 parts carrier oil.

Use caution with cats!

Any of the essential oils listed in this article are safe for dogs and horses, however; cats are a different story! Cats are extremely sensitive to essential oils containing phenols, such as oregano and thyme. Cats can not effectively metabolize phenols because they lack an enzyme in their liver to digest the phenols. Avoid Peace & Calming® essential oil blend on your cat, as it does contain phenols. Lavender and Roman Chamomile essential oils ARE safe for cats.

How to apply essential oils on dogs, horses and cats:

For calming dogs:

Mix 1 drop Lavender, Roman Chamomile or Peace & Calming® essential oil with 1 drop carrier oil.  Rub this mixture on your dogs pads, ears or comb through their fur.  Apply any time you sense your dog is stressed.

For calming horses:

Mix 1 drop Lavender, Roman Chamomile or Peace & Calming® essential oil with 1 drop carrier oil. Rub this mixture on your horse’s muzzle, ears or cornet bands. Apply any time your horse is stressed.

For calming cats:

Mix 1 drop Lavender or Roman Chamomile essential oil with 10 drops carrier oil. Rub this mixture on your cat’s pads, ears or comb through their fur. Apply any time your cat is stressed.

By the way, the essential oils in this article are also good for easing your anxieties, too!  Dilution is not required on humans.  Just apply a drop or two on your wrists, shoulders or behind your ears.

And the next time you’re opening up a bottle of lavender essential oil, share some with your animal friends!  They’ll thank you!

© 2008 Christa McCourt



Source by Christa McCourt

How to Make Natural Candles – Choosing the Best Wax For Making Candles at Home

There are several natural waxes to choose from for your homemade candle.

While paraffin may be natural in that it’s a petroleum-based wax it has been shown to be not so healthy & doesn’t burn clean so I think we can eliminate this wax.

Healthier natural candle waxes are Palm, Beeswax, and Soy & Ghee.

Let’s check out some pros & cons of each of these waxes.

Palm in made from the wax of the berry of the Palm tree. It’s white, all natural, renewable & clean burning.

Palm wax has a unique crystalline structure that is very attractive.

It can hold a very high scent load. Some palm waxes can hold up to twice as much scent as paraffin or soy wax.

Palm wax comes in granular form, is very easy to work with & it pools evenly when lit. It doesn’t need any additives & it cleans up easily with soap & warm water.

Cons of palm wax; the cost of palm wax is a slightly more than Soy wax.

Turning to Soy candle making, this wax has lots of Pros too. It burns long, cool & clean.

Here is a list of advantages a manufacturer gives about their soy wax:

o Made with pure, 100% natural soybeans

o Longer, cooler and cleaner burning without soot buildup

o Made in the USA with domestically grown crops

o Produced containing NO Genetically Modified Material

o Manufactured meeting FDA and Kosher standards

o Easy to clean up with soap and hot water eliminating solvents

o Renewable sustainable resources requiring plant growth

o Biodegradable and free from pesticides and herbicides

o Very stable allowing for long shelf life

o Not subject to animal testing

Cons of soy candles:

It’s stated by some manufactures that soy candles are produced containing no Genetically Modified Material. For most soy waxes this is only true because after processing there is no DNA in the wax left to assess whether the soy beans used were GMO or not. In the United States in 2002, 98% of the soybean harvest was either genetically modified (GMO) or non-GMO mixed in with GMO soybeans. The only reliable source of non-GMO soybeans are Identity Preserved or Certified Organic, these are very few. This means buying soy wax that is not Identity Preserved or certified organic is supporting the biotech industry. This is a disadvantage of soy wax in my opinion. Also I feel soy candles made from GMO soybeans can’t really be called “natural” as their DNA was humanly modified, the fact that the DNA was later removed doesn’t negate that.

Now lets look at Beeswax which has been used for candles since ancient times.

It burns slow & clean & has its own sweet fragrance.

It gives of more light & heat than other waxes & is virtually drip less.

Beeswax is the only fuel to emit negative ions when burning & this process cleans the air of positive ions such as dust, odors, toxins, pollen, mold, dust mites feces, and viruses.

Lighting a beeswax candle inspires a spiritual feeling; they have traditionally been the candles of choice in many churches.

Using a sheet of beeswax & rolling it up with a wick inside is such a simple way to start making candles, a pair of scissors are the only equipment needed. Beeswax candle making with sheets is child’s play.

Poured beeswax candles are just as easy to make as candles make with other waxes.

One con for beeswax is that the price is significantly more than other waxes but this is balanced by the quality it has of burning slower & lasting longer than other waxes. Beeswax can be added to other waxes to increase their burn time. Beeswax candles have their own natural sweet fragrance with which only some aromas will nicely blend. Beeswax can be bought in either a yellow or white color. Some white beeswax may have been bleached & have chemicals added, best check with the supplier.

Bayberry wax is an aromatic greenish vegetable wax that is removed from the surface of the Bayberry by boiling the berries in water and skimming the wax from the surface. Burning a Bayberry candle to the nub during the holidays is a 300-year tradition supposed to bring good luck in the coming year. Bayberry wax is recommended for making dipped tapers only & may not burn well as votive, tea-light or pillar candles.

Bayberry wax costs about 4 times that of Beeswax. It takes 15 pounds of Bayberries to make one pound of wax. It has a warm, earthy fragrance reminiscent of newly mown hay, and dries to a lovely olive green color. A small amount can be added to other waxes to make them harder & impart its green color. This is a pro as there are no other natural colorants for candles apart from the yellow of the beeswax. All natural candles, that is totally natural candles, are white unless they have beeswax or bayberry wax added.

Ghee lamps have traditionally been used by Sikhs & Hindus for thousands of years as a spiritual practice. Lighting the light dispels darkness & brings comfort, hope & peace. Lighting a light with cow ghee specifically is said to ensure radiance & heavenly bliss, prosperity, health & happiness.

Ghee is made from unsalted clarified butter. It is easy to make for one’s self at home or one can buy it from the grocery store. Organic ghee is available. Once one learns to make a container candle one can make a ghee candle. Securing the wick in the middle of the container without glue is the trick. Traditionally the receptacle of the ghee is earthen mud, silver, gold or brass, never stainless steel. The wick traditionally is laid on the bottom of the container & is propped up on the side of the lamp rather than standing up straight in the middle. I have bought a ghee candle made in a small glass jar with a lid that has a central wick & it works fine. I would be very careful about propping the wick on the side of a glass container. Ghee is very soft at room temperature & a liquid when heated so it needs a container. My ghee candle burns without a ghee smell & gives a very sweet feeling. Now I know how to wick the jar I can keep renewing the candle by adding ghee & wicks or I can make a much bigger one that burns longer for the same price as my little store bought candle.

Whichever material you use for your candle, don’t let having to decide which wax delay you making one! Choose a wax & make a candle, its fun, can save you money & using the candles brings bliss.



Source by Jess Woods

How Do You Use Essential Oils to Make "Aromatherapy" Candles?

The term “aromatherapy” is a branch of alternative medicine which claims that the specific “aromas” carried by the essential oils have curative effects. The healing art “aromatherapy” traces back to 4,000 B.C. where the Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, and Persians use to burn herbs and flowers for curative and cosmetic purposes. In ancient Egypt, plant oils were widely used for spiritual relaxation, cosmetics and for embalming and mummification of the dead.

The term “aromatherapy candles” is used loosely in Western societies, because, unlike other cultures, we mainly use “aromatherapy candles” for “aesthetic” qualities vs. healing qualities. We want the calming, soothing aromas to aid in meditation, bathing and relaxing activities.

Natural candles are becoming more popular with the development of natural waxes such as soy wax and palm waxes. There is a greater desire by consumers to go “green” with all natural ingredients in candle making. Using all natural soy wax that is a renewable resource, grown right here in the U.S.A. has gained popularity in the few years, since the development of soy wax in 1998. Soy wax is hydrogenated soybean oil that is non-toxic, biodegradable and environmentally friendly. Combining all natural ingredients, including natural scents, to make an “aromatherapy” candle is highly desirable.

A lot of so called “aromatherapy” candles out on the market today contain paraffin wax (which is a byproduct of the crude oil process) and fragrance oils that are chemically derived. Some major manufacturers have paraffin wax, combined with natural scents. Some have natural waxes combined with chemical derived synthetic scents. My idea of a natural “aromatherapy candle” is one that is all natural. So, what are natural scents? They are essential oils.

Essential oils are volatile parts of plants, trees, fruits and roots that are extracted by various methods: steam distillation, cold-press extraction, chemical solvent extraction and the effleurage method. Essential oils that are “pure” will mostly have their botanical name on the jar, and come in dark colored bottles for protection from sunlight. They should be stored in cool, dark places, and out of reach of children and pets. Other essential oils are blended with carrier oils such as jojoba and are considered “diluted”. Some candle manufacturers sell “essential oils”, but they come in clear plastic containers, and are synthetically derived, or are blended with alcohol or other solvents.

Because of their concentrated nature, pure essential oils can be more expensive than fragrance oils and come in small bottles – drams (1/8 oz), 1/6 oz., etc. They either have a closed lid or a dropper to distribute the essential oils. Price can range from anywhere from $5 to $75 for a fraction of an ounce of pure essential oils.

So, how do you use essential oils in candle making? Good question – and there are many answers to that question, depending on who you talk to. When I originally tried to research this topic a year ago, there was very little information out on the Internet, with candle supply companies, or any e-books I purchased. One year later, there is a wide variety of answers published in articles, candle supply websites, and so-called “candle gurus”. Some experts claim that usage per pound of wax is 1 oz – which is similar to using fragrance oils. Now, 1 oz of pure essential oils can be either incredibly strong or incredibly expensive. Others claim that using as little 3-20 drops/pound of wax.

I personally believe that the aromatherapy candles should use much less essential oils than fragrance oils for two reasons:

1 Style & Taste. When using essential oils in aromatherapy candles, I want a milder, less dominant, natural scent aroma from the essential oils. I don’t want an over-powering Cinnamon Spice fragrance oil aroma that’s going to fill my entire house for days. I want a “natural” candle, because I want a soothing, relaxing, mild, fresh, natural aroma that gives just enough scent to soothe my senses for a beautiful bubble bath, meditation, yoga or Pilates exercises. I don’t want the aroma competing with what I’m trying to achieve – relaxation.

2. Cost. Essential oils are expensive, and cost should be considered when buying and using “pure” essential oils in candle making. First of all one dram (1/8 oz) of 100% pure Peppermint oil (made right here in the U.S.A.) on sale was $5/dram plus shipping. Honestly, do you think you it’s cost effective to use $5 of Peppermint oil in one 8-12 oz. soy candle? I don’t think so, besides, it may be too strong. Fragrance oils (mainly synthetics) can be 10 times less expensive when purchased in bulk. I’ve used blends of essential oils with 1/6 oz. and made three 12 oz. soy candles, and they were perfectly scented. So, it’s the cost/benefit rule you have to apply in determining how much you’re willing to pay to achieve your desired outcome.

Another important consideration in how much essential oils to use in candle making, is using the wax manufacturers guide in how much fragrance/essential oils that the wax will absorb in order to make a safe candle. I primarily use 100% soy waxes for my candle making, and the manufacturers recommendation is to use 3-9% of fragrance oil per pound of soy wax. There are additives which can increase those percentages, but I mainly use 1 oz. of fragrance oil/pound of soy wax, which is approximately 6%. When using essential oils, I use much less than 1%/pound of wax. It all depends on how strong or pure the natural oil is and my taste, of course!

So, with those facts explained, using essential oils is a matter of style, taste and cost. If you are selling your candles, you pass along your costs to the consumer, but hopefully, you can market and price your candles effectively to sell them at a profit. If you are making candles for your own enjoyment, then it’s a matter of what you’re happy with – milder/stronger, and whether cost is a factor for you.



Source by Laureen Falco

The History of Scented Candles

Candles have been an important part of human society for thousands of years. Originally, the only way to possibly see once the sun went down, was from either torches, fires, or candlelight. Torches were not safe indoors, and walking from room to room carrying a portable fireplace with you was not practical or possible. Therefore, candles lit the way. Everything was done by candlelight once the sun set, from carrying out one’s chores, reading, sewing, or even signing the Constitution of the United States.

Candles also had a useful purpose in early China. There, they actually invented a type of calibrated candle called a “candle clock” that was used for keeping time. Weights were inserted into the candle at precise locations, and when the wax melted to a certain level, the weights dropped into a container below and made a noise. Imagine what it would be like to have a candle alarm clock to wake up by (don’t try to hit the snooze button), or to try to time your bread in the stove based on a candle clock?

Originally, candles were not made using the high quality of wax that we have today. Instead, they were made from whale fat in China. Later, Japan learned how to extract wax from squirrels (don’t ask me how). In the Middle Ages, candles were frequently made from the fat of various animals, such as cows and sheep. The smell from manufacturing these types of candles, however, was so horrendous that several cities banned the manufacturing process. Instead, candles were soon made from beeswax, which had a less unpleasant odor. In 1850 paraffin became available commercially, and soon all candles were made from a type of paraffin.

Those who made candles and experimented with various types of materials were called chandlers (from which we get the word today “chandelier”). From the earliest of times, candle makers added scents and fragrances to produce the best scented candles. It started in China with the ‘time clocks”. Incense sticks were often inserted into the wax to add a wonderful aroma. In fact, sometimes the incense was added at particular intervals so that the change in fragrance, rather than the dropping of weights, indicated the change in time. Later, India also discovered the aromatic benefits of using a wax made from boiled cinnamon for their candles. Unlike the use of animal fat, which smelled horrendously during the manufacturing process, the use of cinnamon provided a relaxing and fragrant aroma.

In addition to experimenting with scented candles, some ingenious candle makers also attempted to create a smokeless candle. They understood what such an invention would mean….no more wick means no more flame! No doubt fires starting from candles were a fairly common. Thomas Payne was one such individual. In the late 1700’s he attempted to invent a smokeless candle, but was not able to do so. Benjamin Franklin also started off as a candle maker before he began his political career, and experimented with various types of materials and methods for candle making. However, it would be centuries later before such technology would be pioneered and wickless candles would be available wide spread.

One reason for the delay of scented and wickless candles is because candles were put on the back burner once kerosene lamps were invented. Then, candles almost became completely extinct upon the invention of the light bulb later at the end of the nineteenth century.

However, in the 1980’s and especially in the 1990’s, the rebirth of the popularity of candles became an international phenomenon. This was due partly to their decorative value, but also to their ability to allow the stressed out, modern, over-worked homeowner an opportunity to create a relaxing environment using the aromatherapy of scented candles. At the same time, awareness over air quality and health conditions such as asthma and allergies led to the exploration for a more safe and healthy, environmentally friendly scented candle. Once again, the search for a flameless candle began, and once again, scent, or fragrance, became very important.

Armed with the modern electrical age, the invention of a flameless scented candle became possible. Scentsy is generally credited as the company that invented wickless scented candles in the year 2004 and satisfied the need in the market for a healthy, safe, environmentally clean and fragrant candle that burns a high quality wax without a flame. Instead, a low voltage light bulb uses a decorative selection of ceramic warmers to heat a scented wax bar with a very long life. Scented wax bars can be mixed and matched to create custom scents. This allows each customer to be their own “chandler”, or “candle maker” as they personalize their own candle and candle warmer to suit their individual taste.

Yes, candles have come a long way over the last thousands of years of human history. From burning whale blubber and holding your breath just so you avoid the offensive smell of the candle, to today when people actually buy a scented candle for the main purpose of the wonderful smell it emits, we can all be thankful for the age of enlightenment!



Source by Alisha Byars

Candle Making Projects That You Can Try

The Basic Candle Making Procedure

There are so many different types of candle making procedures that it is hard to choose which one that you want to try. For this reason we are going to go over the basic procedure for each form of wax. We are going to start with teaching you how to make a candle out of crayons.

How To Make A Candle Out Of Crayons

Here is a list of everything that you are going to need for this project:

crayons, if you have crayons around your home that are broken and just lying on the floor then these are great to use for this product. It is also a great way to recycle as most of these crayons would simply be thrown away. Make sure that you take the time to remove all of the paper that is wrapped around the crayons as the paper will interfere with the process.

Boiling bags, you can find these bags at almost any cooking supply store, they are great because they completely eliminate the cleanup process. All that you need to do when you’re done with them is throw the bag away.

Boiling pot, any boiling pot will do for this project.

Wicks and wick tabs.

A glass jar.

Start off with using which ever colors that you want to use for your candle. If you want to mix colors around then you can mix several colors and then simply them into the same boiling bag. If you want to make a layered candle with many different colors than simply put all of the like colors together. For example, if you want to make a candle that is blue, green, and purple then you are going to want to use three boiling bags for that. Put green crayons into one bag, blue crayons into another, and purple crayons into the last bag. You can melt them all at the same time and simply layer the candle as you go.

Put water into the boiling pot and begin to boil the water. As the water is boiling add the boiling bags to the pot. Now wait about 5 to 10 minutes and the crayons will be melted. As you are waiting for the crayons to melt string the wick through the wick tab and glue the bottom of the wick to the bottom of the jar. When the crayons are done melting you can simply pour them into the jar. As you do this make sure that the wick it is not disturbed as you pour the wax.

Not put the jar aside for 24 hours, make sure that it is in a place where it will not be disturbed by children or animals. After 24 hours the candle is ready to use and you are done with this project

How To Make A Candle With Gel

This is a list of the different candle making supplies that you are going to need for this project. You can find most of these supplies in a candle making kit or you can simply buy them individually or find items around your home.

A candle pouring pot – If you do not have a candle pouring pot then do not worry as you can easily use a double boiler instead. If you do not have a double boiler then you can make one at home with a boiling pot and an empty soup can or coffee can.

A carving knife, a thermometer, some gel wax, a zinc wick, wick tab, fragrance oils, color dyes, a metal spoon, a glass container or candle mold, and some newspapers. Ready to begin?

Step # 1. To start the gel candle making process the first thing that you are going to want to do is to choose a work area. Choose a place that is flat, level, and that will not be disturbed by pets or children. Cover this area with newspapers.

Step # 2. Now prepare the wax. Cut pieces of the gel wax in to the top pan of the double boiler, then fill the bottom pan of the double boiler with water. When you have done this then place the double boiler on to the stove top and bring the heat up as you want the water to boil.

Step # 3. As you are waiting for the wax to melt you are going to want to prepare the wick and the mold. Make sure that the mold is free of dust and hair. Now string the wick through the wick tab if this is not already done for you. When this is done then simply put the wick tab at the bottom of the mold. Many people use glue to hold the wick tab in place, this is a great idea as otherwise the wick tab may fall out of place as you pour the gel wax in.

Step # 4. Make sure that you check on your gel wax often and check the temperate with the thermometer. The gel wax should melt at around 200 degrees, you are not going to want it to get too much hotter than that. Stir the wax while it is melting.

Step # 5. When the gel wax is all melted then now is the time to add scented oils and color dyes.

Step # 6. When the wax is all melted here comes the hard part. Pour the gel wax in to the candle mold. Make sure that you take your time and that you do not burn yourself as the wax is very hot. When this is done then simply put the mold to the side in order to let it sit and cool off. Leave it alone and in a place where it will not be disturbed for about 24 hours. When the 24 hours have passed then take the mold and and trim the wick to about a quarter of an inch. You are done!

How To Make A Candle With Paraffin Wax

Here is a list of all of the candle making supplies that you need: a double boiler, some paraffin wax, color dye, scented oils, wicks, wick tabs, carving knife, scissors, metal spoon, thermometer, and a candle mold. You can easily find all of these items online or at an arts and crafts store for fairly cheap. If you want you can make the double boiler yourself using a boiling pot as the bottom pot and an empty soup can as the top pot.

Now clear a surface to work with, make sure it is flat and level and not going to be easily disturbed. Cover the area in newspapers to protect it and make clean up easier. Now when the area is prepared take the carving knife and cut chunks of the wax in to the top pot of the double boiler. Place the top pot on the stove and boil the water. Stir the wax often and check the temperature as it should melt at around 160 degrees.

Now if the wax is melted you can add the scents and color just be sure to mix them in well. When the wax is melted then string the wick through the wick tab and place it in the bottom center of the mold. Pour the hot wax in to the mold but be careful not to burn yourself. Put the mold to the side and let it cool for 24 hours. Now when the 24 hours has passed simply remove the candle from the mold and trim the wick to a quarter of an inch and you are done.



Source by Jason Kinech

How Do You Use Essential Oils to Make "Aromatherapy" Candles?

The term “aromatherapy” is a branch of alternative medicine which claims that the specific “aromas” carried by the essential oils have curative effects. The healing art “aromatherapy” traces back to 4,000 B.C. where the Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, and Persians use to burn herbs and flowers for curative and cosmetic purposes. In ancient Egypt, plant oils were widely used for spiritual relaxation, cosmetics and for embalming and mummification of the dead.

The term “aromatherapy candles” is used loosely in Western societies, because, unlike other cultures, we mainly use “aromatherapy candles” for “aesthetic” qualities vs. healing qualities. We want the calming, soothing aromas to aid in meditation, bathing and relaxing activities.

Natural candles are becoming more popular with the development of natural waxes such as soy wax and palm waxes. There is a greater desire by consumers to go “green” with all natural ingredients in candle making. Using all natural soy wax that is a renewable resource, grown right here in the U.S.A. has gained popularity in the few years, since the development of soy wax in 1998. Soy wax is hydrogenated soybean oil that is non-toxic, biodegradable and environmentally friendly. Combining all natural ingredients, including natural scents, to make an “aromatherapy” candle is highly desirable.

A lot of so called “aromatherapy” candles out on the market today contain paraffin wax (which is a byproduct of the crude oil process) and fragrance oils that are chemically derived. Some major manufacturers have paraffin wax, combined with natural scents. Some have natural waxes combined with chemical derived synthetic scents. My idea of a natural “aromatherapy candle” is one that is all natural. So, what are natural scents? They are essential oils.

Essential oils are volatile parts of plants, trees, fruits and roots that are extracted by various methods: steam distillation, cold-press extraction, chemical solvent extraction and the effleurage method. Essential oils that are “pure” will mostly have their botanical name on the jar, and come in dark colored bottles for protection from sunlight. They should be stored in cool, dark places, and out of reach of children and pets. Other essential oils are blended with carrier oils such as jojoba and are considered “diluted”. Some candle manufacturers sell “essential oils”, but they come in clear plastic containers, and are synthetically derived, or are blended with alcohol or other solvents.

Because of their concentrated nature, pure essential oils can be more expensive than fragrance oils and come in small bottles – drams (1/8 oz), 1/6 oz., etc. They either have a closed lid or a dropper to distribute the essential oils. Price can range from anywhere from $5 to $75 for a fraction of an ounce of pure essential oils.

So, how do you use essential oils in candle making? Good question – and there are many answers to that question, depending on who you talk to. When I originally tried to research this topic a year ago, there was very little information out on the Internet, with candle supply companies, or any e-books I purchased. One year later, there is a wide variety of answers published in articles, candle supply websites, and so-called “candle gurus”. Some experts claim that usage per pound of wax is 1 oz – which is similar to using fragrance oils. Now, 1 oz of pure essential oils can be either incredibly strong or incredibly expensive. Others claim that using as little 3-20 drops/pound of wax.

I personally believe that the aromatherapy candles should use much less essential oils than fragrance oils for two reasons:

1 Style & Taste. When using essential oils in aromatherapy candles, I want a milder, less dominant, natural scent aroma from the essential oils. I don’t want an over-powering Cinnamon Spice fragrance oil aroma that’s going to fill my entire house for days. I want a “natural” candle, because I want a soothing, relaxing, mild, fresh, natural aroma that gives just enough scent to soothe my senses for a beautiful bubble bath, meditation, yoga or Pilates exercises. I don’t want the aroma competing with what I’m trying to achieve – relaxation.

2. Cost. Essential oils are expensive, and cost should be considered when buying and using “pure” essential oils in candle making. First of all one dram (1/8 oz) of 100% pure Peppermint oil (made right here in the U.S.A.) on sale was $5/dram plus shipping. Honestly, do you think you it’s cost effective to use $5 of Peppermint oil in one 8-12 oz. soy candle? I don’t think so, besides, it may be too strong. Fragrance oils (mainly synthetics) can be 10 times less expensive when purchased in bulk. I’ve used blends of essential oils with 1/6 oz. and made three 12 oz. soy candles, and they were perfectly scented. So, it’s the cost/benefit rule you have to apply in determining how much you’re willing to pay to achieve your desired outcome.

Another important consideration in how much essential oils to use in candle making, is using the wax manufacturers guide in how much fragrance/essential oils that the wax will absorb in order to make a safe candle. I primarily use 100% soy waxes for my candle making, and the manufacturers recommendation is to use 3-9% of fragrance oil per pound of soy wax. There are additives which can increase those percentages, but I mainly use 1 oz. of fragrance oil/pound of soy wax, which is approximately 6%. When using essential oils, I use much less than 1%/pound of wax. It all depends on how strong or pure the natural oil is and my taste, of course!

So, with those facts explained, using essential oils is a matter of style, taste and cost. If you are selling your candles, you pass along your costs to the consumer, but hopefully, you can market and price your candles effectively to sell them at a profit. If you are making candles for your own enjoyment, then it’s a matter of what you’re happy with – milder/stronger, and whether cost is a factor for you.



Source by Laureen Falco

Making Soy Candles – Anyone Can Do It

Candles can be traced back to biblical times. For hundreds of years they were the only source of light in people’s homes, the earliest of which were made with tallow. It was not until the 1800’s that paraffin replaced this.

A hundred years later and electricity replaced candles, with candles being relegated to fulfilling other roles such as decoration for festive occasions, for the calm and sanctity they evoke in religious ceremonies and the general mood of warmth, relaxation and even romance.

The greatest innovation in the candle industry today is the replacement of the “paraffin” based candle with a natural wax alternative. The soy candles we make burn cleanly releasing no toxins into the air, and they produce no soot or smoke. As they burn cooler and for longer (25- 50% longer) they allow the fragrance to be released into the air for a longer period. This natural, environmentally friendly wax is biodegradable and all containers can be washed with hot, soapy water to be reused. An added bonus to this throw-away society.

Soy Candles are so easy to make when you have simple instructions to follow.

1. Choose the appropriate container for your candle. Container wax can only be used in heat-safe glassware as it adheres to the glass. Estimate how much wax you will be using.

The wax can be melted in either a double-boiler or as a do a rice cooker. The easiest way is to heat and melt half the wax, then allow the heat in the container to melt the rest.

2. While the wax is melting, prepare your containers by selecting the wick you will use and the fragrance and colour. The best thing to do,is to at first try making an unscented and uncoloured wax, so that you can get your technique right.

3. You can use a thermometer, but it is not really necessary. The wicks can be stuck down by either dipping the wick into the wax, or by using the double-sided wick stickers.

4. The room temperature can affect the finish of your candles, so make sure it is not too hot or too cold.

5. Remember, not to overdo the fragrance. 30 mls/450 mls is sufficient. The best way to use the concentrated colours is to grate them on a cheese grater. It is much easier to darken a wax colour than it is to lighten, so be careful.

6. The wax is ready to pour when the container is cool to touch or the wax is starting to cloud. If you find it has set too much, reheat it slightly or sit the container in hot water.

7. It is recommended that you leave your candles for 24 hrs to cool and set. Longer time is necessary if multi-wicked or large containers are used. If you have problems, go to our problem solving and tips for suggestions.

Selecting Your Containers

As soy candles are in jars, the most important decision after your wax is your jars. There is an endless variety you can choose from. Once you get the candle making bug, all containers will be looked at in a very different way. Half the fun is finding new and interesting jars.

There are numerous jar suppliers in Victoria and interstate, so get catalogues from all of them, compare sizes, prices, minimum orders & payment terms. Easy to do with internet access. (Suppliers, listed)

Purchasing through jar suppliers means all the hard work has been done for you by selecting the glass that is suitable for your candles.

However, if you do want to source your own here are some tips:

A good candle container should have a diameter wide enough so that it can be lit and extinguished easily. This also means that the fragrance throw will be better even if the candle is not lit.

Jars with lids retain the fragrance for longer and prevent dust and debris from falling into the candle. Do not extinguish a candle by placing the lid on.

Do not use fine glassware such as champagne glasses for candles. They may look great but they are not made to withstand a high temperature. And as the glass is quite thin, they also retain a lot of heat making them very hot to handle as well as prone to cracking.

Metal containers have become very popular as Travel Tins because they are unbreakable. Remember to source tins that are seamless. Some with joints can leak when the wax is hot. Hazardous when you are pouring and hazardous for your customers if they leak when being burnt. Apart from getting wax all over the surface it is sitting on, they can also become a fire hazard. If you are unsure, test it by filling it with water and letting it sit for a couple of days.

Ceramic is popular for feature items or a table centre piece as they can match the d├ęcor.

Jars that have a wide neck and a narrow base can cause problems when the candle is nearing the end. As the base is narrower, it means the wick is closer to the sides. This will result in a very hot jar and a jar that is normally fine may become prone to cracking due to excessive heat.

Silverware is popular for special events such as anniversaries.

If you are unsure of the suitability of a candle, test it first before offering it to any customer.

Soy wax has made candle making so easy that anyone can do it. Have a go, it’s great fun.



Source by Frosa Katsis